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people and having him educate them, a broad level of education - from the sciences to biology to psychology to theory, religious dogmas, historical information, science - the whole spectrum. and teaching it in such a way that it was never above their heads, and allowing them, then, to apply that knowledge in disciplines that he taught them, and he showed them that god does in fact live in them. so they're called masters - they're mastering their humanity, for the sake of the divine greatness, and celebrating life on a new level, a new understanding. and all of that, as we sit here today, has all been worth living through, finding my own truth, knowing what i know, and willing to live it, no matter what, has evolved me tremendously. and now in reflection, i look back and see that without adversity, we never know our own strength. >> i want to tell you that i love you - >> and we love you. >> - and that you are worth loving indeed, and for you to also understand, coming from social consciousness, for you to re-remember as it were, that your god loves you more than all else, for
degree is in medical technology. my family always wanted a doctor, and so i headed toward the sciences. and going to medical school was something that i knew would be beneficial to the "race," world race, my race. but my thinking was, "i don't want to be a doctor who paints. i think i want to be a painter." it was like i was already an artist, but i mean, i just, i sort of had to say that to myself. my first interest is in the structure of something. and so when i start out making something, i'm not thinking about who might have lived there. i'm thinking about how i want it to look. structure for me is number one. and then i will decide who might have lived there. somes i will move away frowhat i'm working on and look at it -- look back at it -- and move around it and look at it. it's a process of getting a fresh look at something. it's like working on a drawing and you back up to see what your perspective is. and you see how you're doing -- how if it's flowing the way you want it flow, if it's moving the way you want it to move. i bent the metal one way, and i saw that the top part wa
to become "the rice bowl of japan." so we really see a huge intervention by people-- science and technology-- in order to... for this particular region to become the rice bowl that it is now. narrator: by mid-may, the long winter has finally ended and it is time to plant. kobayashi fukuzo is a farmer of recognized skill. at 71, he knows how unforgiving the weather can be. he worries constantly about what he should do mechanized agriculture allows to anto continue to farm.rice. the fields are irrigated. irrigation is crucial. the rice seedlings depend on water, rather than soil, for much-needed nutrients. rice farmers in northeastern japan have a traditional enemy. called yamase, this cold wind can blow through the region anytime from june to mid-august. while it can be absent for years, in 1993, yamase caused extensive crop damage in tohoku. when the cold winds blow, temperatures drop, fog develops, and the plants don't get enough sunlight. stunted alks are a bad omen. thflower clusters, which precede the grains of rice should be much bigger. kanno hiromitsu is an atmospheric geographer. he
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